Meet BK Marcus (Liberty.me Interview)

BK1-300x268Here at Invisible Order, we’ve been doing a lot of work for Liberty.me over the last 9 months. Now that the project has really come to fruition, here’s the Liberty.me bio interview of our own BK Marcus.

 

 


Today we’re introducing B. K. Marcus, “Chief Bookworm” of Liberty.me. Our Library and Liberty Guides are made available to you all thanks to him and his colleagues at Invisible Order.
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Texan heroes of liberty

One great benefit of traveling down to Texas for Voice & Exit was getting to hang out with some Texan heroes of liberty.

Before V&E with Albert Lu, host of The Power & Market Report:

(This was taken after my first taste of Texas BBQ! Yum.)

(This was taken after my first taste of Texas BBQ! Yum.)

At V&E with John Papola, creator of my favorite hip-hop video, “Fear the Boom and Bust” a Hayek vs. Keynes Rap Anthem:
bkPap

After V&E with Jeff Riggenbach, the voice of liberty, author of “The Libertarian Tradition” and Why American History Is Not What They Say:
bkRigg

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Class War in the Time of Robin Hood

RobinHoodCroppedOur founder, BK Marcus, has a new article up in the Freeman today, presenting a careful libertarian rethinking of “that paragon of armed social justice, that singular personification of class conflict: Robin Hood.”

BK explains,

As advocates of such voluntary exchange, we too often resist Robin Hood’s rob-from-the-rich morality, as we resist any talk of fundamental conflicts of interest between different classes. But the targets of Robin Hood and his merry men—like the targets of the Peasants’ Revolt—were rich from plunder, not production.

Like the radical liberals of the nineteenth century, the “peasant” rebels of the 1300s—when Robin Hood’s exploits fired the imagination of an oppressed people—recognized that their enemies were the tax collectors, legislators, and all other members of the political class.

Read the Freeman and enjoy.

PS: Which one is more libertarian — the Russell Crowe or the Kevin Costner Robin Hood? Comment below to take a side.

 

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A Century of Anarchy: Neutral Moresnet through the Revisionist Lens

Earle-CenturyOfAnarchy-CoverPeter C. Earle now has a fun, insightful, short book on the quirky, serendipitous, inspiring history of a briefly semi-stateless place: Moresnet.

Moresnet was, as Earle explains, “an unintended consequence of the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) [c]reated as a triangle of neutral territory between Prussia and the Netherlands by the Congress of Vienna.”

In essence, neither nation controlled the place, and the people were largely left to their own devices. As a result, Earle says,

Moresnet encapsulates the archetype of market anarchy. Hidden in its history we find privately produced, commodity-backed money; competing avenues for the administration of justice; negligible — and, it seems, entirely avoidable — taxes and fees; few, if any, regulations; a defense force without a standing military; open borders (however unintentionally); and an irrepressibly entrepreneurial spirit.

This is a very neat short history of a very neat place. The book is, of course, produced by Invisible Order, and it is available on Amazon.com for just $2.99. Go buy yours now.

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Faulty Premises, Faulty Policies

FaultyPremisesCoverWe at Invisible Order are proud to announce our most recent publication: Faulty Premises, Faulty Policies, available in Kindle edition and paperback (and also as a free ebook with a Liberty.me membership).

Jeffrey Tucker calls it “an incredibly good guide to showing precisely what is nonsensical about political debate.”

How many times have you watched a public policy fiasco and been mystified as to how the politicians can believe their own rhetoric? They talk about how raising the minimum wage is going to make the poor better off, even though there is no mechanism in the nature of things to bring about that reality; about how some new war is going to rid the world of despotism, despite knowing that the history of war tends in the opposite direction; about how some new healthcare mandate is going to bring freedom from disease, and yet you know that legislation can’t actually achieve anything like this.

There always seems to be a missing step in the chain of logic. Politicians and pundits actually seem to believe that passing a law will generate a certain wonderful result, even though the relationship between cause and effect is nowhere present. It seems like a giant exercise in fantasy.

Galles has provided an outstanding tool for navigating your way through the sea of folly that is the politics of our time. There is no anger in his prose, and there doesn’t need to be. He has the arguments, the analytics, and the facts — those alone make the case.

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Horrible Schools for Serbia

18k280m3qck38jpg-760x429If you came across a blog post entitled “Očajne škole za ceo svet,” and like me you don’t speak or read Serbian, it might not look relevant to Invisible Order in specific or to libertarian writing in general. But if you scroll down all the way to the bottom, you’ll see my smiling face.

Indeed, this blog post turns out to be the recent Serbian translation of my 2012 article in the Free Market, “Horrible Schools for the Whole World.” In it, I explained the horrors and absurdities of the UN “Education for All” program.

Marko Islamovic, the president of the Serbian libertarian youth organization Libertarijanska Asocijacija, reached out to me last week to ask if his organization could translate and repost the article. Of course, I was honored to consent. Click here to see the article in English on the Mises Daily, and click here to see the website of Libertarijanska Asocijacija.

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Proud Little Englander

(Image from Shutterstock)

(Image from Shutterstock)

Ever wonder what a “Little Englander” is? See BK Marcus’s article on how “words from Victorian England continue to haunt advocates of freedom and peace” in today’s Freeman.

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