Author Archives: Nathalie Marcus

About Nathalie Marcus

Nathalie Marcus is a bilingual (French and English) editorial consultant for print books, ebooks, and audiobooks. As an audiobook producer, she finds the voice actors to narrate the books, sets the production schedules, and oversees the postproduction and auditing (quality assurance) of the final products. She holds a PhD in French literature from the University of Virginia.

All Hands on Deck

Monday, March 4, was National Grammar Day, and to celebrate Grammarly.com held a photo contest to capture the best (and most hilarious) grammar errors that litter our semantic landscape.

Here’s our favorite, slightly augmented:

WashAllHands

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Editing for Liberty #14: A Whale of an Error

Spot the Error

  1. Insurance companies must compete for clients, while the client must bare the fiscal responsibility of his actions.
  2. Whaling is still as prevalent today as anytime in history, due to the close cultural and religious associations the fish has with various indigenous groups of Ainu, Inuit, and the Basque people of the Bay of Biscay.
  3. Obama seems hell bent on expanding the US welfare state at any cost, and of course no welfare state debate is complete without bringing up the Scandinavian countries as the perfect example of massive statism bringing prosperity.
  4. But mass production, if applied to anything beyond the simplest kind of article, depends not only on division of labor and multiple operations, but also on uniformly accurate, interchangeable parts.

Read on for the solutions! Continue reading

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Editing for Liberty #13: Fixing Common Mistakes in Optical Character Recognition

This week I worked on a couple of classic books that were converted from scans or old PDFs using optical character recognition (OCR). OCR is the computerized process that “reads” an image of a text and outputs actual machine-encoded text that can be republished in a new format.

OCR is what allows us to take a faded old manuscript, rescue the text, and make a sleek new ebook out of it. But the process is far from perfect.
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Editing for Liberty #12: Electrical Bill

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. I have to pay the electrical bill.
  2. Each of these policies came out of the idea that society could and should be engineered from the top-down to give rise to efficiency, community, and prosperity.
  3. The correspondence between three factors of production . . . as taught by the classical economists is untenable.

Read on for the solutions! Continue reading

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Editing for Liberty #9: The Dismal Science

Thomas Carlyle (1795–1881)

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. I spent all of Saturday in the tub, reading a historic romance about a Spanish pirate and a Dutch duchess.
  2. Economics’s reputation as a “dismal science” can be traced back to Thomas Carlyle.
  3. He was friendly, but he remained apart, aloof … an outsider.

Read on for the solutions!
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Editing for Liberty #8: Prefixes, Ellipses — and Squirrels?

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. I hope the book serves to help turn the tide against the destructive antihuman-progress thinking so prevalent in today’s world.
  2. Jon and Mark . . . found a box! . . . Jon had nothing to say about it.
  3. Enjoyment is not as an important function for courting as it is for dating.

Read on for the solutions! Continue reading

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Editing for Liberty #7: Prognosis Postcard

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. During the debate, his prostate stance became obvious.
  2. Obama claimed that Kenya’s failure “is in its ability to create a government that is transparent and accountable. One that serves its people and is free from corruption.”
  3. Lack of spending by the private sector is causing companies to layoff workers.

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