Category Archives: Editing for Liberty

Editing for Liberty #13: Fixing Common Mistakes in Optical Character Recognition

This week I worked on a couple of classic books that were converted from scans or old PDFs using optical character recognition (OCR). OCR is the computerized process that “reads” an image of a text and outputs actual machine-encoded text that can be republished in a new format.

OCR is what allows us to take a faded old manuscript, rescue the text, and make a sleek new ebook out of it. But the process is far from perfect.
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Editing for Liberty #12: Electrical Bill

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. I have to pay the electrical bill.
  2. Each of these policies came out of the idea that society could and should be engineered from the top-down to give rise to efficiency, community, and prosperity.
  3. The correspondence between three factors of production . . . as taught by the classical economists is untenable.

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Editing for Liberty #11: (Be)cause & Effect

Coin of Emperor Basil I (reigned 867–886 AD)

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. At some point, Basil also began sleeping with his wife, since she bore him two more sons after Michael’s death.
  2. Under market conditions, such dismal performance would unquestionably have a substantive impact on a company’s bottom line; after all, if an airline agreed to bring its passengers to Maui but instead brought them to Midland, a rational observer would expect the business to flounder soon after.
  3. The elimination of such antiproperty-rights laws will make people more self-reliant and thus less dependent on government.

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Editing for Liberty #10: Presidents and Prepositions

Mises (1881–1973)

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. Obama came into office without a strong set of economic ideas, as former Presidents Reagan and Clinton did.
  2. Since Mrs. Jefferson moved to Baltimore in the 1990s, she was not aware of the underlying complexities.
  3. Murray Rothbard and other economists of the Austrian school have rejected the concept of indifference and have developed an approach based on Menger’s law of diminishing marginal utility and von Mises’s axiom of action.

Read on for the solutions!
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Editing for Liberty #9: The Dismal Science

Thomas Carlyle (1795–1881)

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. I spent all of Saturday in the tub, reading a historic romance about a Spanish pirate and a Dutch duchess.
  2. Economics’s reputation as a “dismal science” can be traced back to Thomas Carlyle.
  3. He was friendly, but he remained apart, aloof … an outsider.

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Editing for Liberty #8: Prefixes, Ellipses — and Squirrels?

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. I hope the book serves to help turn the tide against the destructive antihuman-progress thinking so prevalent in today’s world.
  2. Jon and Mark . . . found a box! . . . Jon had nothing to say about it.
  3. Enjoyment is not as an important function for courting as it is for dating.

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Editing for Liberty #7: Prognosis Postcard

Can You Spot the Error?

  1. During the debate, his prostate stance became obvious.
  2. Obama claimed that Kenya’s failure “is in its ability to create a government that is transparent and accountable. One that serves its people and is free from corruption.”
  3. Lack of spending by the private sector is causing companies to layoff workers.

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